Stoicism and Seneca on OCD and anxiety.

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Stoicism and Seneca on OCD and anxiety.

Stoicism and Seneca on OCD and anxiety.

We’ve all suffered from bouts of obsessive-compulsive disorder, checking the door multiple times to make sure that it’s locked is incredibly common, worrying about things that you cannot control is even more common, whether it’s keeping your job, or keeping that roof above your head or having enough money to last the month, we’ve all experienced bouts of anxiety and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). None of us, however, give any thought to the fact that anxiety and OCD is just part of what it is to be a human being. Animals that are prone to be prey are prone to worry.

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Life Isn’t Fair…

Life Isn’t Fair…

Life isn’t fair, it’s never been fair and it’s not meant to be fair. So why do we expect to be treated fairly in life? This is one of the greatest lessons that a person can ever learn. That life isn’t fair. How can it possibly be fair when everyone’s circumstances differ so much from person to person, place to place? Think about it, you didn’t choose to be born, you didn’t pick your parents, you didn’t pick your life circumstances and you didn’t pick the people you went to school with and you don’t get to pick the people

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An interview with his Noble Majesty, the Emperor Marcus Aurelius.

An interview with his Noble Majesty, the Emperor Marcus Aurelius.

At the standup, philosophers were known to be very great admirers of the Stoic emperor Marcus Aurelius and the wealth of philosophical teachings that he’s gifted us with. Not only was Marcus a great philosopher, but he was one of the best leaders of not only Rome but the ancient world too. It’s only natural that a great man like Marcus would dominate the Roman world, were he alive today I’m sure that he’d dominate this world too. Were it possible to interview him today we think that it might go something like this… Goals and Enemies. Q. As emperor

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La Mettrie’s Anti-Seneca

La Mettrie’s Anti-Seneca

    Intro The philosopher physician returns and this time he brings his own ethics on happiness. However, his ethics sharply contrasts with that of the stoics putting forward hedonism over virtue (but not over the pleasure derived from collecting new knowledge it must be said). First published in 1748, while shacking up at Fredrick’s court, Anti-Seneca had gone through many revisions, rewritten many times by La Mettrie for the purpose of perfecting his morality drawn from his own interpretation of materialism. As is typical with our darling philosopher physician, contention, controversy and condemnation trails not far behind him with

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Comicus Muo vs The Death Penalty…

Comicus Muo vs The Death Penalty…

With a little help from Marcus Aurelius… I like to think of myself as a modern-day stoic, I like the idea that we can live for virtue, or more simply put that we can resolve to do the right thing at the right time as often as circumstances allow.   A virtuous life is indeed a good life, all of us have an innate understanding of virtue, (the correct way to act).  Virtue is its own reward and in order to improve ourselves over time we must embrace virtue and avoid it’s opposite (namely vice). “Waste no more time arguing

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Introduction to Stoicism

Introduction to Stoicism

Introduction to Stoic Philosophy I’d like to take a few minutes of your time to introduce you to Stoic Philosophy. It’s Stoic because we talk about the non-physical mind and an ancient set of beliefs that have for most of our pre-enlightenment history been regarded as forgotten truths not commonly shared with everyone… You see it’s like this. Every problem that we as human beings might encounter has at some time or another happened to others in enough numbers that a few of those people have been mindful enough to record a solution that we can use to help us

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Marcus Aurelius on injury, anger and betrayal

Marcus Aurelius on injury, anger and betrayal

One of the great things about Stoicism, is that it helpfully puts its practitioners at ease with the world around them, a world that can often be cruel, unkind, unjust and just about awful in so many ways that the non-philosophical amongst us can be easily driven to give up on life and end it all. Suicide comes in many forms, whether it’s jumping off a bridge into the cold depths of the river below, overdosing on alcohol and pills in the hope of quietly slipping away from this life or worse yet the long drawn out mental decay of

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Then I will be happy! Fame and being Insulted

Then I will be happy! Fame and being Insulted

    I wrote this article about three miscellaneous themes we encounter in life. Namely, goal directed behaviour (then I will be happy), fame and being at the receiving end of insults. In addition with some stoic psychology thrown in the mix the purpose is to raise awareness and gain greater understanding of these themes so that we gain apathia or freedom from afflictive emotions (pathos).     Goal Directed Behaviour Just like a Roman senator who thinks “when my service to Rome is finished I will retire to my countryside villa, then I will be happy” the modern individual

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Why I love Stoicism

Why I love Stoicism

We’ve already mentioned in some of our other articles on this site that to live for pleasure alone is probably not a good life.  It’s ironic that the pursuit of happiness can lead you to places that are not very happy at all. The stoic will see happiness as the necessary byproduct of something else, namely virtue.  The opportunity to practice virtue in your daily life, to measure your own mind, to take time out for introspection so that you can clearly see your own flaws and formulate a plan to deal with them so that you can in turn

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Thoughts on The Meditations of Marcus Aurelius

Thoughts on The Meditations of Marcus Aurelius

Before reading the Meditations of Marcus Aurelius, I would highly recommend that you get yourself a modern translation of it. It can be hard to read an older version as Old English and the archaic use of language doesn’t come naturally to modern people which in turn can make you stumble through the text and lose the subtle nuances of some of the passages. I’ve recently completed reading Meditations (A New Translations, with an introduction by Gregory Hays) which I found to be a very easy, light and intelligent read that allows the personality and gentle nobility of Marcus Aurelius

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