Marcus Aurelius on injury, anger and betrayal

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Marcus Aurelius on injury, anger and betrayal

Marcus Aurelius on injury, anger and betrayal

One of the great things about Stoicism, is that it helpfully puts its practitioners at ease with the world around them, a world that can often be cruel, unkind, unjust and just about awful in so many ways that the non-philosophical amongst us can be easily driven to give up on life and end it all. Suicide comes in many forms, whether it’s jumping off a bridge into the cold depths of the river below, overdosing on alcohol and pills in the hope of quietly slipping away from this life or worse yet the long drawn out mental decay of

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Then I will be happy! Fame and being Insulted

Then I will be happy! Fame and being Insulted

    I wrote this article about three miscellaneous themes we encounter in life. Namely, goal directed behaviour (then I will be happy), fame and being at the receiving end of insults. In addition with some stoic psychology thrown in the mix the purpose is to raise awareness and gain greater understanding of these themes so that we gain apathia or freedom from afflictive emotions (pathos).     Goal Directed Behaviour Just like a Roman senator who thinks “when my service to Rome is finished I will retire to my countryside villa, then I will be happy” the modern individual

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Why I love Stoicism

Why I love Stoicism

We’ve already mentioned in some of our other articles on this site that to live for pleasure alone is probably not a good life.  It’s ironic that the pursuit of happiness can lead you to places that are not very happy at all. The stoic will see happiness as the necessary byproduct of something else, namely virtue.  The opportunity to practice virtue in your daily life, to measure your own mind, to take time out for introspection so that you can clearly see your own flaws and formulate a plan to deal with them so that you can in turn

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Thoughts on The Meditations of Marcus Aurelius

Thoughts on The Meditations of Marcus Aurelius

Before reading the Meditations of Marcus Aurelius, I would highly recommend that you get yourself a modern translation of it. It can be hard to read an older version as Old English and the archaic use of language doesn’t come naturally to modern people which in turn can make you stumble through the text and lose the subtle nuances of some of the passages. I’ve recently completed reading Meditations (A New Translations, with an introduction by Gregory Hays) which I found to be a very easy, light and intelligent read that allows the personality and gentle nobility of Marcus Aurelius

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Time Gives No Refunds!

Time Gives No Refunds!

This article is concerned with the theme of time as an important commodity. With an analysis of Seneca’s ‘On Saving Time’ a short letter to Lucilius, Seneca’s friend. I pick out statements from the letter and give my own commentary on them with a conclusion at the end of the article to finish off. Feel free to comment!     “Continue to act thus, my dear Lucilius – set yourself free for your own sake; gather and save your time, which till lately has been forced from you, or filched away, or has merely slipped from your hands” -Seneca Seneca

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Marcus Aurelius on the futility of Kleos (Everlasting Fame)

Marcus Aurelius on the futility of Kleos (Everlasting Fame)

We’ve all seen them, those fame hungry and vapid stars of reality TV who hope that a few weeks brief appearance on some ‘entertainment,’ show will elevate them to the point of stardom, that all will love them and celebrate their existence from now until eternity. How does the Stoic feel about Kleos (everlasting fame)? What’s really going on? Is it a worthwhile pursuit? ‘People who are excited by posthumous fame forget that the people who remember them will soon die too. And those after them in turn. Until their memory, passed from one to another like a candle flame,

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11 ways to banish anxiety and Live each day as a separate life.

11 ways to banish anxiety and Live each day as a separate life.

“Begin at once to live, and count each separate day as a separate life.” ― Seneca This is a wonderful quote from a wonderful philosopher, variations of it have been uttered many times, by many people down the centuries since the days of Rome so much so that it’s synonyms have become pop culture favorites of celebs, writers and pseudo-intellectuals (like me) that usually say something along the lines of… ‘Live each day as if it is your last, you never know, you might be right…’ Variations of the above quote exist everywhere from those black framed and mounted motivational

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Giving Thanks

Giving Thanks

I’ve recently been struck by the fact that the noble Emperor Marcus Aurelius began his meditations by giving thanks. The first book ‘The Meditations of Marcus Aurelius, Debts and Lessons,’ begins with him listing in words every good person that he’d met who’d had some positive influence on him. Everyone from old friends, advisors, people of note and teachers are included. He includes both the exalted and the humble in this first meditation. Whilst initially you might think, ‘what’s the point of this?’ desperately trying to plough through it to the ‘interesting stuff,’ (like I did) about life, the universe

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Seneca on Suffering, Wisdom and Adversity…

Seneca on Suffering, Wisdom and Adversity…

The meaning of life. As we’ve previously mentioned in other articles for there to be a meaning of life (as opposed to the meaning you may choose to give your own life) it has to meet the following criteria to be true… CUOT It has to be compulsory, universal (applicable to everyone) and obvious, so obvious in fact that there wouldn’t even be a question as to the meaning of life, everyone would know why we exist and understand our role is in the grand scheme of things making it unquestionably true. Lots of people may tell you what they

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Seneca on the Happy Life.

Seneca on the Happy Life.

“For what prevents us from saying that the happy life is to have a mind that is free, lofty, fearless and steadfast – a mind that is placed beyond the reach of fear, beyond the reach of desire, that counts virtue the only good, baseness the only evil, and all else but a worthless mass of things, which come and go without increasing or diminishing the highest good, and neither subtract any part from the happy life nor add any part to it? A man thus grounded must, whether he wills or not, necessarily be attended by constant cheerfulness and

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