Philosophers throughout the ages

Philosophers throughout the ages

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On The Nature Of Things

On The Nature Of Things

    Introduction The star of this article is Lucretius, a Roman poet living within 1st BCE Republican Rome. What makes this poet extraordinary and quite unique is that he wrote an epic length poem not of romance, heroism, adventure or any of that sentimental claptrap but wrote a philosophical poem on that of nature. You see, Lucretius was both a poet and a philosopher who synthesised the two into his magnum opus, The Nature of Things (De Rerum Natura, in Latin) a work dedicated to Epicurean philosophy. Typical of all works of naturalistic philosophy you will begin to notice

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Thoughts on The Meditations of Marcus Aurelius

Thoughts on The Meditations of Marcus Aurelius

Before reading the Meditations of Marcus Aurelius, I would highly recommend that you get yourself a modern translation of it. It can be hard to read an older version as Old English and the archaic use of language doesn’t come naturally to modern people which in turn can make you stumble through the text and lose the subtle nuances of some of the passages. I’ve recently completed reading Meditations (A New Translations, with an introduction by Gregory Hays) which I found to be a very easy, light and intelligent read that allows the personality and gentle nobility of Marcus Aurelius

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Merry Christmas from the Stand Up Philosophers 2017

Merry Christmas from the Stand Up Philosophers 2017

Merry Christmas from my colleague (Epicurus of Albion) and I (Comicus Muo) to all of our august and noble readers from across the world. 2017 has been a good year for us wannabe philosophers who starting a blog with zero visitors have seen it gain an enormous amount of traction this year. The comments we’ve received from our readers are kind, thoughtful, constructive and highly welcome. We’ve come to love our readers and their own unique philosophical insights into the ‘good life,’ and welcome all comments and points of view and will endeavour to do our best to broaden our

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Lucretius ponders how spirits inhabit new bodies

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The audiences’ reaction to happy nihilism

The countenance of the audience on having read Comicus’ article ‘Happy Nihilism’    

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Socrates at the symposium

   

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La Mettrie’s Machine Man

La Mettrie’s Machine Man

Just to clarify, We begin with Descartes’ dualistic Cartesian animal-machine idea (which was popular at the time) which viewed all animals, except humanity, as automatons, as complex machines without an immortal soul. The mind/soul of man was separate from his material body it was argued, man was thought to be a special snowflake whose essence transcended the mere sum of his parts. This idea bode well with the theological narrative and wasn’t repressed by censorship. La Mettrie admired this idea of Descartes, but disagreed with its formula being that only animals were without souls, he thought Descartes mistaken as he says:

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