Mystic Nihilism, Reincarnation in Materialist Form – Part 2

Mystic Nihilism, Reincarnation in Materialist Form – Part 2

Mystic Nihilism, Reincarnation in Materialist Form – Part 2

Infinity and nothing are very closely linked. There’s something very strange about ‘nothing,’ because we can conceptualise it and not experience it. It’s impossible to have an experience of ‘nothing’ in this universe which is made up of things, everywhere you look ‘nothing,’ does not exist! Likewise, there’s something very strange about infinity, and that’s because infinity can also be conceptualised but not experienced. Science tells us every day that the universe is not only made up of finite things but is itself finite. We can be reasonably sure of how big it is, but despite its vast size, it

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Naturalist Credo on What is The Ultimate Law?

Naturalist Credo on What is The Ultimate Law?

      Laws… they are present in all manner of civilisations be they theological or secular. We have the holy man’s act of preaching during a religious ceremony that God’s laws are the highest laws, the secular moral philosopher putting ink to paper arguing for his ideas on jurisprudence and the act of government passing legislation for all the citizens of the society to follow. All these are examples of the manifestations of laws. However, you can stand up in the middle of a mass in church and call for God to strike you dead because of your atheism

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The Chief Good

The Chief Good

  Introduction In this article we will explore the epicurean notions of wellbeing my primary source is book one of Cicero’s De Finibus in which Lucius Torquatus delivers a broad outline of epicurean ethics. (Lucius Manlius Torquatus was an ancient Roman statesman and military general during the later Roman Republic. Torquatus was an epicurean as revealed in Cicero’s De Finibus written in 45BC which accounted philosophical discourses of Cicero’s younger days. He was friends with Marcus Junius Brutus and the esteemed Roman polymath Marcus Tullius Cicero.)   The epicurean pleasure ‘The chief good, the chief good!’ This phrase was all the

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La Mettrie’s Last Stand

La Mettrie’s Last Stand

  After the controversial fallout of Anti-Seneca, our philosopher physician gives his final caper in his writing of the Preliminary Discourse which was included in his Philosophical Works published in 1750. Since this was the last of his works, for he died a year later, it can be considered to be his most mature espousal of his materialist philosophy and defence of it. Ann Thomson the editor of Machine Man and Other Writings published by Cambridge University Press summarises this work: “His main aim in the Preliminary Discourse is thus both to reaffirm his materialism and to show that his

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Carbon Copies, Reincarnation in Materialist Form – Part 1

Carbon Copies, Reincarnation in Materialist Form – Part 1

Did you know that due to the nature of matter that given enough time, material and space there will at some or other have to be an identical copy of you? The bigger the universe gets the more likely there is to be a copy of you out there somewhere and that’s because in the approximate 1 cubic meter of space that you inhabit there’s only so many finite combinations of matter that can occur, hence the idea that if it was physically possible to traverse the universe, it’s highly likely that you could not only meet your doppelganger, but

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La Mettrie’s Anti-Seneca

La Mettrie’s Anti-Seneca

    Intro The philosopher physician returns and this time he brings his own ethics on happiness. However, his ethics sharply contrasts with that of the stoics putting forward hedonism over virtue (but not over the pleasure derived from collecting new knowledge it must be said). First published in 1748, while shacking up at Fredrick’s court, Anti-Seneca had gone through many revisions, rewritten many times by La Mettrie for the purpose of perfecting his morality drawn from his own interpretation of materialism. As is typical with our darling philosopher physician, contention, controversy and condemnation trails not far behind him with

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On The Nature Of Things

On The Nature Of Things

    Introduction The star of this article is Lucretius, a Roman poet living within 1st BCE Republican Rome. What makes this poet extraordinary and quite unique is that he wrote an epic length poem not of romance, heroism, adventure or any of that sentimental claptrap but wrote a philosophical poem on that of nature. You see, Lucretius was both a poet and a philosopher who synthesised the two into his magnum opus, The Nature of Things (De Rerum Natura, in Latin) a work dedicated to Epicurean philosophy. Typical of all works of naturalistic philosophy you will begin to notice

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Pessimism of Birth by Lucretius

Pessimism of Birth by Lucretius

    A Human Baby’s like a sailor washed up on a beach    By the battering of the surf, naked, lacking the power of  speech, Possessing no mean of survival, when first Nature pours Him forth with birth-pangs from his mother’s womb upon Light’s shores. He fills the room up with his sorrowful squalls, and rightly so! – Just think what lies in store for him, Life’s full supply of woe.  

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Then I will be happy! Fame and being Insulted

Then I will be happy! Fame and being Insulted

    I wrote this article about three miscellaneous themes we encounter in life. Namely, goal directed behaviour (then I will be happy), fame and being at the receiving end of insults. In addition with some stoic psychology thrown in the mix the purpose is to raise awareness and gain greater understanding of these themes so that we gain apathia or freedom from afflictive emotions (pathos).     Goal Directed Behaviour Just like a Roman senator who thinks “when my service to Rome is finished I will retire to my countryside villa, then I will be happy” the modern individual

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The Poem of Eternal Death by Lucretius

The Poem of Eternal Death by Lucretius

      Death has no loopholes. All of us must meet it in the end. We go through the same motions in the same old place. No measure Of added life will ever coin for us a novel pleasure. True, while we lack that which we long for, it is an obsession, But we will just crave something else once it’s in our possession; We are forever panting with an unquenched thirst for life. No one knows what the years to come will bring – what joy or strife May lie in store for us, what outcome’s looming in

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