Marcus Aurelius on Death and the Cessation of Being

Marcus Aurelius on Death and the Cessation of Being

Marcus Aurelius on Death and the Cessation of Being

Like all great philosophers Marcus Aurelius the noblest of the Emperors of Rome also pondered death.  Here’s a collection of quotes detailing what he had to say on the subject. “You boarded, you set sail, you’ve made the passage.  Time to disembark. If it’s for another life, well, there’s nowhere without gods on that side either.  If to nothingness, then you no longer have to put up with pain and pleasure, or go on dancing attendance on this battered crate, your body—so much inferior to that which serves it. “One is mind and spirit, the other earth and garbage.” Marcus

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Why is Sophistry Bad?

Why is Sophistry Bad?

Thanks to Plato and his dialogues of Socrates the term ‘Sophist,’ is not held in high esteem. To accuse someone of ‘sophistry’ is to imply that they are acting in bad faith and not being entirely honest in their arguments. In contrast, a ‘sophisticated’ person is held to be in high esteem, like James Bond, suave, cool and well educated, a gentleman packed full of worldly experience. Whether it’s fashion, culture, sports and politics a sophisticated man not only knows it all but also knows how to behave in different places and circumstances. He can fit in anywhere and advance

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The Stoic Virtue – Temperance

The Stoic Virtue – Temperance

Temperance is one of the 4 Stoic Virtues and is best summed up as a moderated, balanced and disciplined life. For example whilst it’s undoubtedly good to work for a living, it’s not temperate to work all of the day, every day of the week. To do so means missing out on other things, such as time with friends, family, various entertainments and people who interest you. Likewise, not working at all is also not temperate. A man without an income is also liable to miss out on many things that make life worthwhile. Work has to be balanced with

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Thoughts on Virtue, Part 1 – Sacred Life

Thoughts on Virtue, Part 1 – Sacred Life

If whilst walking in the countryside you encounter a spider’s web that blocks your path, do you go around or do you break it? Does it matter if the spider is present or absent? What do you do? Do you stop and consider that both you and spider are equally precious, the universe has yielded you both in the same big bang. So what do you do, do you walk on by, finding a divergent route, or simply walk through it, breaking the tiny threads? Likewise, if you see an insect struggling for life, trapped on the surface of a

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On Old Age by Cicero – fourth objection, It is not far from death.

On Old Age by Cicero – fourth objection, It is not far from death.

  We come to the last conclusion of this series, the fourth objection: “We must finally consider the fourth objection to growing old – an objection that seems especially calculated to cause worry and distress to a man of my years. I speak of the nearness of death” I will draw upon the philosophy of later stoicism which are relevant to this subject and more updated. This also touches upon whether there’s an afterlife of not, which as I usually do throughout the work, I’ll give my own evaluation.   Death is not to be feared From Cato’s point of

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On Old Age by Cicero – Third objection, It deprives us of almost all sensual pleasures.

On Old Age by Cicero – Third objection, It deprives us of almost all sensual pleasures.

  Moving on from the last topic, Cato continues on his defence of old age; he gladly proclaims: “We come now to the third objection to growing older – that the pleasures of the flesh fade away. But if this is true, I say it is indeed a glorious gift that age frees us from youth’s most destructive failings” Bearing in mind that this work is not exclusively for old people but also for the youth who may grow to old age. The main themes of this objection are addressed by each sub-heading.   Where desire rules, there is no

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Cathars or Western Buddhists?

Cathars or Western Buddhists?

In the wake of a thrilling conversation with my good friend and collaborator on this site (Epicurus of Albion) the other day I decided to dive deep into the mystical interpretations of the life of Jesus with the idea that it might make a good article. This is not that article, but along the way, I rediscovered the fascinating world of the now-extinct Cathars and the interesting parallels that their beliefs have with Buddhist teachings/philosophy. I don’t tend to write explicitly about religion on this site for the simple reason that the focus of theology tends to be the correct

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On Old Age by Cicero – Second objection, it weakens the body.

On Old Age by Cicero – Second objection, it weakens the body.

    Cato continues his pep talk on why old age should not be looked upon as a burden: “I no longer wish for the strength of youth – that was the second objection to growing older we listed – any more than when I was a young man I desired the strength of a bull or an elephant.” Cato’s declaration here is one of non attachment and equanimity he does not grasp at the loss of his youthful strength. Instead Cato recommended that we be utilitarians in whatever stage we are in the aging process. Moreover, Cato’s indifference to infirmity

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On Old Age by Cicero – First objection, It takes us away from an active life.

On Old Age by Cicero – First objection, It takes us away from an active life.

    In the first objection against old age, Cato fights against the claim of old age as a period in our lives where things slow down and stagnate and argues there are alternative activities that are just as dignified if not even more. “What kind of activities are we talking about? Don’t we mean the sort we engage in when young and strong? But surely there are activities suitable for older minds even when the body is weakened.” Cato gives examples of a handful of famous elderly Romans such as Gaius Fabricius Luscinus, Manius Curius Dentatus and Tiberius Coruncanius. Who

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Meaning, not happiness…

Meaning, not happiness…

By all accounts Albert Camus was a very happy man, he lived the high life, enjoyed outrageous parties, having a taste for fun and shared the company of many girlfriends.  He was evidently a very sophisticated man, that enjoyed all of the pleasures that life would afford him. Albert Camus spent his life searching for meaning, and being unable to find any, never gave up. The act of seeking is a virtuous act, whilst action with virtue is a good thing because it leads to the development of a better character, a fact that was not wasted upon Aristotle (a

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